December yoga schedule 2018 Dili Timor Leste

Oráriu Dezembru December yoga schedule 2018

Yoga schedule for Dili Timor Leste December 2018

The 2nd 200hr plus, yoga alliance certified , yoga teacher training (YTT) by Dili Ashtanga Yoga will be starting in December. The program can be taken as a whole or modules (Yoga Anatomy, Yoga Philosophy, Yoga Methodology and Yoga Asana adjusting) can be chosen separately. The ytt can be a great tool to deepen your yoga practice and to create a solid practice. The schedule will be organised per student’s availability . For more information contact me per email ahimsaka.satya@gmail.com

The self practice of yoga is an important practice and is the foundation of self realization . All the classes in more or lesser extent are directed to this direction. The private classes can be used to get (re)started with a personal self practice and based on the individual needs of your (ayurvedic) body constitution to find harmony. Or as a preparation for any of the other group or semi group classes and they can be excellent for joining the mysore morning classes. For more information contact me per email ahimsaka.satya@gmail.com
Mysore style classes is an individual practice within in a group. You will share the dynamics and energy of a group class without having to adjust your pace or breath. You can come when you can, do your practice and leave when you are finished. It is a unique way of doing class and related to the Ashtanga yoga style. But not limited to it.

Dili Ashtanga Yoga

First yoga school / shala in Dili , Timor Leste /East Timor

Dili Ashtanga Yoga offers various yoga classes, workshops ,yoga retreats at various locations around Dili . From Ashtanga vinyasa yoga (Mysore style & LED), Hatha yoga to yin yoga and anything in between. At the city center to beach locations. Primary series and beyond. Suitable for all levels. For anyone who is interested in the practice of yoga.

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Dili Ashtanga Yoga

First yoga school / shala in Dili , Timor Leste /East Timor

Dili Ashtanga Yoga offers various yoga classes, workshops ,yoga retreats at various locations around Dili . From Ashtanga vinyasa yoga (Mysore style & LED), Hatha yoga to yin yoga and anything in between. At the city center to beach locations. Primary series and beyond. Suitable for all levels. For anyone who is interested in the practice of yoga.

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Dili Ashtanga Yoga schedule November 2018

Dili Ashtanga Yoga

First yoga school / shala in Dili , Ti6mor Leste /East Timor

Dili Ashtanga Yoga offers various yoga classes, workshops ,yoga retreats at various locations around Dili . From Ashtanga vinyasa yoga (Mysore style & LED), Hatha yoga to yin yoga and anything in between. At the city center to beach locations. Primary series and beyond. Suitable for all levels. For anyone who is interested in the practice of yoga.

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Dili Ashtanga Yoga

First yoga school / shala in Dili , Timor Leste /East Timor

Dili Ashtanga Yoga offers various yoga classes, workshops ,yoga retreats at various locations around Dili . From Ashtanga vinyasa yoga (Mysore style & LED), Hatha yoga to yin yoga and anything in between. At the city center to beach locations. Primary series and beyond. Suitable for all levels. For anyone who is interested in the practice of yoga.

Mysore style practice

Mysore style

The Mysore style of yoga teaching is unique to the Ashthanga Vinyasa Yoga tradition designed by Sri K Pattabhi Jois last century. It enables the student to practice (explore) a fixed sequence of yoga asana on her/his on pace by following external as well as internal guidance. External guidance would be a teacher, who assist with mostly hands-on adjustments and fewer verbal instructions, and the inspiration of the fellow students around. Internal guidance would be foremost the breathe, the internal dialogue and body intuition / intelligence.
The student is not blindly following the instructions of the teacher but is activley present with the yoga sequence that is happening. The mind aswell as the body are involved in the sequence. Some days the body isn’t moving at all, other days the mind just seems totally out of it. It is here that observation of both body and mind takes place. Concentration, focus, preparation, calculation and observation are all qualities of the brain that need to be trained too. To remember which pose comes next requires some mental effort, and prevents the brain of zoning out into oblivion. It keeps the brain connected to the present, what is happening here and now. Mysore style of teaching puts more responsibility with the student and allows more space for the internal observation. It honors the diversity of the body, and let the student work with that diversity.
The teacher is not instructing the student with which asana comes next; but allows the student to move through her/his practice and adjusting where necessary. The adjustment are mostly physically and directed directly to the body, to prevent ego involvement. Though the teacher will observe both body and mind, and will work on both to create space, strength and ultimately balance and harmony.
The Mysore style of teaching goes hand in hand with the Ashthanga vinyasa sequences, though the style of teaching could be extended to any kind of sequence. As long as the student and teacher know which sequence is being followed, the Mysore style class could be functioning. Different sequences for different students to honor the diversity of the students. It requires intimate involvement of the teacher which her/his student practice and it asks from the student a commitment to the practice and an independent attitude. As a student you have to follow your inner guidance, using your internal devises to navigate yourself through the practice (and eventually life). The teacher is not there to tell you which pose is next and what to do, though will tell you when you forget. The teacher will guide you through the practice where it is necessary by letting you do your own practice.
The body remembers by repetition, its the mind that’s label’s repetition as boredom. The mind likes to spin, to move in between opposites. When the body remembers stillness, it will ask for more. That is where the asana and vinyasa comes in, the effect of the asana plus the sequence is one of inducing stillness (how stimulating, energizing, aggravating or heating it may seem at first glance ). The body and eventually the mind will long for that stillness. From there chance will happen.
Ahimsaka is offering every weekday the possibility of Mysore style classes from 6 a.m. to 7.45 a.m., at Dili Ashthanga Yoga, hosted at Dili Wellness / The upstairs Studio , Comoro road (opposite Leader, next to Harish and Dili Club). Please contact Ahimsaka first if you like to practice Mysore style.

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Ashthanga yoga & running

(Ashthanga) yoga & running
Ashthanga vinyasa yoga practice can benefit your running practice.
“I cannot take a yoga class because I’m not flexible is like saying I cannot take a shower because I’m dirty “. As yoga isn’t about being flexible, actually not even about becoming flexible (though it is a beneficial side effect), it is about purifying the body and mind. Mosts sports start with “I can’t do that”. But after the initial start it moves towards the attitude of “I ran 5 miles, maybe I can ran 10 next time” or” I did 10 push ups, maybe I can do 15″. The reply to not able to do yoga would be;” you could when you start training”. Which coincides with the infamous saying of the father of Ashthanga yoga himself, Sri K Pattabhi Jois; “practice, practice, practice and all will come.
Running will not make your physical practice of asana better, but yoga will definitely make your running better, physically speaking. As long as runners can make peace with that idea, it will make it a whole lot easier to move through 1st series ashtanga yoga for 90 minutes. You are bound to be tight, but without yoga you will only get tighter and probably experience more injuries.
Both in 90 mins of ashtanga yoga or 90 minutes of running you will have to overcome the quitter’s mind. That during 90 minutes of either activity you are probably going to question yourself ; “What was I thinking to do 90 minutes of yoga/running.” Something is going to hurt, some posture, or mile is going to be brutal, and you might start to lose your motivation. When doing anything physical you are going to run up against that voice in your head that is the pessimist, the nay-sayer. This is where running and yoga are similar. They are both working on the mind, more than on the body. Your body can do just about anything it is the mind that is often the limited factor.
When practicing / training 99% of the people are actually facing doubt, insecurity, worry, fear the “negative” self. The nay-sayer voice that around mile 16 tells you, “You can’t do it.”, is the same voice in yoga that will try to tell you you can’t come up out of a back drop either. The voice is the same, it comes from the same place and can be put to rest the same way no matter if it’s running or yoga. The yoga teacher, Tim Miller, likes to say “Experience is the remover of doubt.” Every time you run 5 miles, it erases the doubt that you can’t run 6. Every time you run 6, it erases the doubt that I can’t do 7. .
The surya namaskars are equivalent to the first mile of any run you go on. It’s the warm up mile, where you find your legs and the rhythm of your breathing. The standing poses are equivalent to a 5k (3 miles), it’s enough of a run on a busy day. The seated postures, up to Marichyasana are equal to about 5 miles. Right in the heart of what are commonly called the speed pump poses in ashtanga there is navasana, bhujapidasana, kurmasana. These are like mile 6, where you start second guessing yourself, and this crazy idea of staying fit. Mile 7 of a 9 mile run starts to smooth out just a bit as you start thinking you’re in the home stretch. Just like the poses baddha konasana, upavishta konasana, and supta padangsthasana do in yoga. You might think backbends are mile 9, but they are only mile 8, you must save enough energy after backbends to complete your inversions and come in strong to savasana. Savasana is equivalent to the cool down after a long run. You don’t just sit down after a long run, or you will quickly stiffen up. You will struggle just to get your shoes off later, if you don’t incorporate a good cool down. Savasana is necessary and so is a good cool down walk after a long run.

The rhythm of breathing, the rhythm of the legs and arms working together, and how the pessimistic mind doesn’t have to win out. Most runs and most yoga practices conquer negativity. Push through the rough spots and come out on the other end better for it. Staring down your inner self has a profound way of changing you. Running and yoga remove doubts by doing the things that you thought couldn’t be done.
Running tightens you, Yoga will save you from injuries and even burn-out. It will also give your running longevity. Ashtanga yoga is an excellent tool for building strength, flexibility, reducing anxiety, and keeping a person fit. To give an inner focus which often lacked and increased body awareness. Running tightens and stresses the body; it can be harsh and jarring. Yoga strengthens the entire body; lubricates each joint; deepens and calms the breath; and, in addition to all the physical and emotional benefits, is a deeply spiritual practice that makes us more mindful and peaceful.
Deep or diaphragmatic (as opposed to chest breathing) brings more oxygen deeper into the lungs, ultimately engaging the parasympathetic nervous system. When were are in “parasympathetic dominance,” the mind is calmer, the heart rate is slower, less stress hormones are produced, and perceived exertion decreases.
In “Going the Distance”, (again in Yoga Journal, though this one is available to read online), Nancy Coulter-Parker writes about increasing athletic endurance—what she defines as “the ability to persevere”—with yoga, which made her feel strong and capable. Through her asana practice she became intimate with her breath, and learned what pushing too hard sounds and feels like. Before yoga she felt like her body was an inanimate object outside of herself. Something that, for better or worse, hung dispassionately from her head. Yoga has and continues to reintroduce and reintegrate herself to herself.
Yoga helps athletes focus on what is going on inside the body. It is really good at honing that internal voice,” she says. And because Ashtanga is so physically challenging, she has been forced to cultivate the yogic practices of mindfulness, awareness and non-self.
Yoga is not an athletic endeavor. It is much more, and in some ways, more difficult (much like the practice of maintaining self worth apart from achieving the full expression of a particular pose). So while runners should be mindful of the practice they choose, the lessons yoga has to teach any athlete are many. The yoga’s tradition of interconnectedness where all things—including running—are as divine (and yogic) as you let them be.
Often, even our understanding of “concentration” is equated with a straining mental force. In meditation we begin to learn that real concentration depends on a light, delicate, patient kind of mental control, and in time this becomes an effortless, undistracted mindfulness. Both Ashthanga vinyasa yoga  and running, or anything else with a repetitive rhythm (like just breathing!), helps to enable that mind falling “into the moment”.

Based on the post by Stand and face the sun, Posted on 11/15/2013 and other online articles.
Related Online Articles:
BoulderRunning.com, “Runner’s Best Friend – Downward Dog,” by Katrina Mohr.
LA Yoga, “Running into Yoga,” by Ryan Allen
Yoga.com, “How Yoga Can Better Your Running Technique,” by Maia Appleby
Yoga Journal, “Yoga for Runners,” by Baron Baptiste and Kathleen Finn Mendola
“Running Buddahs ” Christopher J. Hayden wrote and produced a 1992 documentary on the the monks of Mount Hiei and John Stevens wrote the book The Marathon Monks of Mount Hiei, published by Shambhala Publications.

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yoga class and workshop schedule december 2014 into 2015

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class schedule from December 2014 and onwards (2015)


Ahimsaka extended his stay at the Gedong Gandhi Ashram in Candidasa, Bali-east and will dedicate his time to teaching according the following schedule at this ocean front location.


-every Monday* & Wednesday ; 4pm – 5.30pm hatha yoga


-every Friday & Sunday ; 4pm – 530pm yin/pratyahara yoga


-every morning 7am ; sun salutations and variations, yoga-puja for and with the ashram members, more than occasionally open to ashram guests and visitors. Designed to support a self-practice and to enkindle the inner-fire or our solar energy.


(please inquire if classes are open before hand with Ahimsaka)


hatha2ashtanga workshop (long weekend)

every first and third friday of the month
(see information below)


ashtanga vinyasa immerison workshops
(see information and dates below)


for more information & inquiry about the workshops @
http://www.baliashramyoga.com or
baliashramyoga@gmail.com


– for additional (private) yoga sessions at the ashram please inquire with ahimsaka; available time slots 10am to 11.30am
(or other slots maybe created depending on the situation/ not available during workshop and retreat).
ahimsaka.satya@gmail.com


additional (private) yoga sessions can be personally catered to your body-mind needs, using yoga (asana, pranayama, meditation) as therapeutic skills, or to create some more time to explore the different aspects of yoga or target different parts of your complete body**. The classes can be shaped onto a focus on asana (classical-, vinyasa- or yin-style), pranayama and/or meditation. The classes can be for one person or more, and can be used for the ashram guests if they desire more yoga.  


* if workshops are happening these afternoon sessions will be tuned in with the workshop and focused on yin/pratyahara yoga
**Alternatively the classes can be aimed to assist with different activities as diving, surfing or a mysore-style format.


>>> hatha2asthanga workshop >>>
twice a month, every 1st and 3rd friday of the month***
(***except when dynamic hatha retreats and asthanga vinyasa immersion workshops are scheduled)
This twenty hours workshop is a middle path between the dynamic hatha yoga retreats and the asthanga vinyasa yoga workshop. It follows the same structure as the ashtanga vinyasa workshop but allows for more openness and diversity in the classes. Depending on the participant preference and needs it can be individually catered towards a more strengthening ashtanga vinyasa practice (set out by Sri Patthabi Jois), or personal designed sequence to (re-) establish a yoga self-practice for in depth exploration of the practice. Ashtanga vinyasa yoga has it roots in hatha yoga, and both share the same source, the 8 (astau) folded path of yoga written down in the yoga sutras by Patanjali. This exploration will cover all the limbs of the 8 folded path of hatha yoga. The yoga practice has been designed to awaken the inner fire of yoga, which is the thread that weaves through the classes of yoga offered in this workshop. To bring out positive changes in our body,mind and life we must enkindle our inner fire. The workshop is hosted at the Gedong Gandhi Ashram and offers a sublime space for self-reflection and self-realization. This exploration workshop is for anyone who likes to move a bit deeper within, to builld a foundation for a yoga self-practice or just wants to immerse into three full days of yoga to balance body/mind.

Hatha yoga creates an understanding of our solar (ha), and lunar (tha) energy in our body and mind and to use both in our (asana) yoga practice and beyond. The Ashtanga Vinyasa sequence has an equal focus on lengthening and strengthening the body. In the hatha into ashtanga workshop we take both angles and join them together as a starting point into our own personal practice. The Ashtanga Primary sequence is used as inspiration for the on going journey into yoga and working our complete body/mind.
The early morning classes will establish a set sequence of yoga asana for you to take up as a self practice. This sequence will have the same structure as the primary series and can be used as a preliminary into the primary sequence, it could also be used as a therapeutic alternative depending on the current body/mind needs, or as a complimentary sequence targeting specific areas of the body/mind that need more attention and development to help facilitate the primary sequence. The mid morning classes will target specific area’s of yoga asana as back bending, inversions, hip-opening, core-strengthening and vinyasa. The mid afternoon session is questions and answers and could cover more the theoretical aspects of yoga. The late afternoon session will be focused on pratyahara yoga; sense-withdrawal, concentration and meditation techniques integrated with the breath and yoga asana. This workshop can be used as in introduction, preparation or exploration into the ashtanga vinyasa yoga as well.

Ashtanga vinyasa is a more strenuous yoga practice, and meant to be heating and purifying the body/mind. Both hatha and vinyasa yoga have many therapeutic aspects in them and are meant to be a (w)holistic practice, targeting the complete body and mental body. The first guide line is always to move within the limits of your own body. Learning to listen to your own body (and breath). From there we explore these limits, taking them as frontiers rather then limitations, and going beyond any set expectations you maybe have of your body/mind.

>>> Hatha2Ashtanga >>>

Format: (meals and puja times etc are according the ashram schedule)
” 6.30 am to 8.15 am: Ashtanga inspired Led class
” 10.15 am to 12 noon: special class
” 3 pm to 4 pm: Q&A Discussion
” 4 pm to 5.30: Yin-yoga/Pratyahara yoga- targeting connective tissue, sense-withdrawal,
breath-work, meditation. (open to non retreat’s participants)

Ashtanga Vinyasa Immersion workshop

An immersion into ashtanga (-vinyasa-) yoga for beginners, the curious and the ashtanga
practitioner who wants to explore and deepen their self practice. Inspired on; but not limited to, the ashtanga vinyasa sequence of Sri Patthabi Jois

dates 2015
23-27 April
4-8 July
15-19 July
24-28 October

(can be combined with the dynamic hatha yoga retreats happening prior to these dates)

A full yoga program covering all the 8 limbs (Ashtanga) of yoga according to the yoga sutras. 3 days of exploration and with the focus of establishing, or fine-tuning, your own yoga practice. Not only the yoga asana, but as a whole (holistic) life style. Depending on where you are with your body and mind the sequence can be modified, adding or skipping asana (or vinyasa), and with additional classes specialized in hip-opening, back-bending, vinyasa, and “yin-yoga for ashtangi’s” (weaving the limbs of the 8/astau limbs of the yoga practice into the physical asana practice) to supply you with more technique, information and practice. Early morning classes are built around the “primary ashtanga sequence”, sun salutations, the primary asana sequence working the whole body/mind. The late morning classes are more of a workshop based class, which target specific parts of the body and mind and go deeper in some of the hatha/ashtanga yoga technique and asana. The late afternoon classes are “lunar-energy” style asana (3rd limb) classes, based of sense-withdrawal “pratyahara”(5th limb), breath exercises (4th limb), concentration techniques (6th limb), elements of yoga nidra and meditation (7th limb). The afternoon session center around the “sukham” part (ease/joy) of the yoga asana, and to apply that into the morning classes, creating sthira (steady/balanced) and sukha within the asana. Making Self-expression part of the whole.

The ashtanga practice is definitely a more strenuous practice, and meant to be a “purifying” practice, the first guide line is always to work within the limits of your own body. Learning to listing to your own body (and breath). From there we explore these limits, taking them as frontiers rather than limitations, and going beyond the set expectations you maybe have of your body and mind.

Ashtanga Format: (meals and puja times etc are according the ashram schedule)
” 6.30 am to 8.15 am: Ashtanga primary Led class
” 10.15 am to 12 noon: special class
” 3 pm to 4 pm: Q&A Discussion
” 4 pm to 5.30: Yin-yoga for Ashtangi’s – targeting connective tissue, sense-withdrawal,
breath-work, meditation. (open to non retreat’s participants)

commends on the previous ashtanga vinyasa immersion workshops and dynamic hatha retreat 2014, at the Gedong Gandhi Ashram.

Alison Worthington (Australia)

I felt truly blessed to have found the Gedong Gandhi Ashram and this retreat during my visit to Indonesia this year. The retreat and the peaceful location provided me with so much inspiration for my yoga practice. The Ashtanga practice was very challenging but was delivered so capably and with such generosity of spirit by Ahimsaka. I wish I could stay longer in his company to mine more of the riches of Ashtanga yoga with his guidance. Everything else in the retreat was just a bonus on top for me. The beautiful community meals, being invited to join in puja, and the afternoon Yin practice filled my days so wonderfully. I want to congratulate Ahimsaka, Rudi, Jackson and all of the Ashram crew and members for welcoming us retreat guests so warmly. Huge thanks also to my fellow yoga students Naomi, Lissette, Rudi, Olivia and Nico (and Elke!). We shared some very special times in our practice, the warmest and friendliest I have ever been part of. I felt very comfortable and encouraged by you all.. thank you for the smiles.. and thanks in advance for all the photos!

Naomi Koster (Hatha) from the Netherlands

Let me start by saying that I had an amazing time in the ashram during the yoga retreat! First of all, the ashram itself was wonderful. Its location next to the ocean, the wide set-up, with several bungalows not too close to each other and the yoga place in the middle make this a very peaceful place to stay. Since my bungalow was near the sea,  I woke up every morning with the sound of the waves, which is a good way to wake up! Also the ashram members made me feel very welcome from the beginning. Everyone seems very relaxed and open to other people. I liked the ‘communal’ meals, with all the guests of the ashram together and besides that the food itself was delicious. I really liked to taste real Indonesian food. In total I stayed for three weeks in Indonesia, but the food at the ashram was the best food I had! The bungalow itself was also nice. I especially liked the hammock outside and the fact that we got tea or coffee at 3 each day to enjoy on our terrace. The only (minor) point of improvement (yes, I promised I would give a few!) is that the mattress was very thin, which made the bed not the most comfortable one I’ve been in. Related to that, one more thing to make it reaaaally comfortable would be to have hot water to shower. However, I hardly had that anywhere on Bali and the temperature outside is warm, so it is not a very important point.
Then of course, the yoga retreat. As a yoga beginner, beforehand I was a little bit scared the level would be too high for me. However, immediately during the first class I found out that level didn’t matter. Since Ahimsaka is such a good teacher and the yoga group was small, everyone could do the class at their own ‘capacity’. I really liked that we just did the whole sequence in once instead of taking one part each day, because this way, I could see improvements much better and I could get used to the sequence so I could practice it at home as well. Ahimsaka had adjustments to the sequences for every level, which means for me that I now know some variations to poses that I’m not flexible enough for. The programme of the ashtanga retreat was also very well balanced. I liked the fact that it was quite intensive, with three classes each day starting at 6.30, and I really liked the midmorning ‘workshops’ where we got into much more depth on specific elements.I think the small group size was a big advantage, because that makes it easier to connect with the other people in the group and also to help each other during the yoga classes I also appreciated the ‘question and answer’ hour a lot! I found it very useful (30 minutes practice to do at home) and inspirational (background and mindset of yoga).
So overall judgement is a 9 out of 10 I would say! I really enjoyed my stay and if I want some time for myself, to do yoga and relax, I will definitely come back. Also, I’ve been continuing the yoga practice at home, alternating between the whole sequence and the 30 minute one, feels great!

Olivia and Nico (France)

“It was a great experience. The Gandhi Ashram is a wonderful place where you can feel spirituality and quietness. The members of the Ashram are lovely. Ahimsaka is a amazing teacher, living according his practice, enthusiastic, careful, generous, always guiding us to go further than our limits. He has an ideal balance between physical practice and interiority. A great teacher !!!
The Schedule was great, a lot of practice, that was perfect.
We really appreciated a lot than you finally find the arrangement with Kelapa Mas, letting us having this wonderful experience despite the fact we couldn’t stay at the ashram. {Due to Ashram’s strict married couples requirement. -Ed}
The class in the water palace was great, it was lovely to take us there. Thank you also for taking me to the healer who was helpful for my foot.
Just a few ideas to make this stay really perfect :
Maybe a week of practice or 5 full days could be better and a  vegetarian diet as it is written in the wall (Gandhi’s words) and according the yogic rules of non violence
Thanks you to all of you, Take care and go on with this peaceful and compassion spirit of the Ashram, We hope meeting you again

Kinds regards, Olivia and Nico
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turmeric the most essential herb for a yoga (asana) practice

turmeric the most essential herb for a yoga (asana) practice

This post is related to a series of post about nutrition & yoga.

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“a day without turmeric is a day without a downward facing dog”

Asana’s work from the outside of the body into the inside of the body, pranayama works from the inside, the core, to the outside of the body. Both work on all aspects of the body mind, from the gross to the subtle. Pratyahara works from the senses and the mind. Dharana works with the mind. Meditation is beyond the mind and works with the subtle energies within the body mind. Nutrients work on molecular level, they can do there work from the inside of the cell, and penetrate the cell from the outside. Taking particular nutrients together with a yoga practice, can upgrade the beneficial effects more, what yoga has prepared within the body mind, nutrients can take beyond that. And/or what the nutrients have been doing on a cellular level, yoga can act on.

Most of this information comes from the following sources;

The Ayurvedic Spice of Life ©2003 Prashanti de Jager (www.omorganics.com)
Yoga and Ayurveda. Dr. David Frawley.

Turmeric is truly a great herb, the following text is merely an abbreviation of the wide range of benefits of Turmeric, and meant to inspire you to add turmeric to your daily diet as adding yoga to your daily life, and notice how well those 2 can go together for your general well-being.
from tao te ching;
When you look for it, there is nothing to see.
When you listen for it, there is nothing to hear.
When you use it, it is inexhaustible.

Dr David Frawley rounds it all up; “There is little that it cannot do in the realm of healing and much that no other herb is able to accomplish. Turmeric has a broad spectrum of actions, mild but certain effects, and is beneficial for long term and daily usage. Though it is a common spice, few people, including herbalists know of its great value and are using it to the extent possible. It is an herb that one should get to know and live with. Turmeric gently stimulates the digestive fire and makes the food easier to digest and absorb. It also helps detoxify the food. In addition it improves the quality of food, adding nutritive and blood building properties to the oils with which it combines, particularly ghee (clarified butter), with which it has an important affinity. It is essential to Ayurvedic diets. In addition Turmeric is a great woman’s herb and is helpful for many gynecological problems. It mildly promotes menstruation, relieves menstrual pain and cramping, is great for countering PMS, and helps build the blood. It helps guard against or even remove cysts in the breast or uterus, and is a good guard against breast cancer. In addition it helps beautify the skin and improve the complexion, promoting circulation and nutrition to the surface of the body. It vitalizes the body’s own natural healing energy through its action of strengthening digestion and circulation, and aiding in the regulation of all bodily systems. For all these reasons Turmeric is likened to the Divine Mother, bestowing numerous blessings and helping us in all dangers, difficulties and conditions of weakness and debility.”

For many reasons Turmeric is also one of the best herbs/foods of Yoga: It is one of the most potent purifying herbs in Ayurveda, cleansing all the bodies including physical and subtle, from muscles to marmas; It is one of the safest herbs; It increases flexibility; It reduces pain and inflammation from practice which means it allows more opportunity to perfect asana’s, stay in asana’s longer and stay in asana’s with greater ease, more sukha and sthira; It increases prana, the flow of prana and purifies prana. Yoga scriptures like the Shiva Samhita recommends that a Yogi take some ghee and milk before asana and pranayama practice, and many traditional yogis add Turmeric to that.

One focus of Yoga Asana is the digestive system and digestion (Gastro-Intestinal (GI) system), which is the basis of our mental and physical health. Turmeric is a great carminative and continues with what the asana have started. Carminatives tend to increase absorption and nurture the intestinal flora. Able to calm an upset digestive system by getting rid of gas and distention. Turmeric is one of the best carminatives because though it leans towards being heating-pungent, it is very balanced and does not aggravate any of the doshas if taken in normal amounts, a few grams per day. Turmeric treats the entire GI system. It is traditionally used for weak stomachs, poor digestion,dyspepsia, to normalize metabolism, to help digest protein, and to increase the bio-availability of food and the ability of the stomach to withstand digestive acids. Turmeric detoxifies the body and mind and in this way helps the body cure itself. One sure sign of this is that it increases the level of the enzyme glutathione S-transferase (GST), which is essential to detoxification. Turmeric is one of the dashemani, the 10 best herbs to treat poisoning and to purify.

Turmeric is an excellent anti-inflammatory herb and therefore is very good treatment for arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, injuries, trauma, and stiffness from both under activity and over activity. If used before and after any surgery it will decrease the pain and inflammation and accelerate the healing and the return to balance. Though Yogis minimize the use of pungents, they do use Turmeric for many reasons, one being it is so good for the tendons and ligaments. It helps them to attain and hold asanas and to avoid injuries. In the same way it minimizes the pain and inflammation related to any kind of exercise or strenuous activity.

Yoga works on the total body and mind, not only the muscles and joints, similar Turmeric has multiple effects on the total body and mind. It is known that Turmeric, and especially the Curcumins, inhibits skin cancer, likely due to decreasing the expression of proto-oncogenes. External application stops pain and swelling, heals wounds, and treats many skin diseases ranging from acne to leprosy.Since Turmeric is bitter and anti-inflammatory, it is excellent for hot skin diseases, especially wet eczema.

Purification, another important focus of yoga, and one of the Niyama’s; “Saucha”. A great alterative, Ayurveda uses Turmeric to purify and move the blood, for instance in the uterus during the menstrual cycle. Curcumin is actually very similar to one of the active molecules in Chaparral, a great Native American blood purifier. Turmeric also protects your liver from toxins and pathogens. It is  known to both destroy major hepatoxins, like aflatoxin, and to rebuild the liver after being attacked by hepatoxins. Turmeric increases the secretion of bile, promotes bilification, and may prevent cholelithiasis.

Turmeric supports the heart in many ways. For instance, there are platelets that flow in the blood whose job it is to form blood clots when we are wounded. The stress of being wounded causes the platelets to accumulate and stick together. In these days we experience a lot of the same stress without being wounded and our platelets start sticking together increasing the chance of a heart attack or stroke. Turmeric is known to inhibit this. Turmeric also removes cholesterol from the liver and inhibits its assimilation, which means that it gives your heart double protection from cholesterol.

Both Yoga and Turmeric have beneficial effects on the respiratory system and is one of the main traditional uses of yoga and turmeric. Yoga (asana and pranayama) are widely used to treat asthma, and cleansing the lungs. Turmeric as an anti-oxidant it protects the lungs from pollution and toxins. It also helps the oxygen transfer from the lungs to the blood. Turmeric with ghee is traditionally used to get rid of cough and to treat asthma.

Yoga has always been used for its therapeutic qualities, and it is here where yoga and ayurveda come really together. To treat a condition with both yoga and ayurveda, in this case, Turmeric, whom both work on the total body and mind, the beneficial effects can be multiple and synergistic.

Taken internally or used externally Turmeric is anti-viral, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, anti-parasitic, and anthelmintic (anti-worm). The essential oil, the water extract, and the extracted curcumins all show this activity. It interferes with the ability of microbes and viruses to replicate themselves and it increases your Immune system’s ability to fight the infection. It kills many bacteria in vivo and in vitro including staph and salmonella so it is great against staph infections and food poisoning. The fresh juice Turmeric is often used for many antibiotic applications such as wounds or whenever an antiseptic is needed. As an antibiotic Turmeric has been compared with penicillin on gram positive organisms and with streptomycin on gram negative organisms. In both cases Turmeric came in second but gave a strong showing.

Oxidation by free radicals is linked with accelerated aging and virtually every major chronic disease including atherosclerosis, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, cataracts, and rheumatoid arthritis. One way to stop this is with anti-oxidants like Vitamin C and E and Turmeric. A second way is with certain enzymes which engage the free radicals and destroy their ability to react. Working double time, the curcuminoids as anti-oxidants are 8 times stronger than vitamin E and also increase the number and activity of free radical destroying enzymes, like superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase.. This means Turmeric is good at keeping you feeling and looking young; protecting you from mutating cells, tumors and cancer; preventing and removing oxidized cholesterol thereby preventing heart attacks; and reducing pain and acute (injuries) and chronic inflammations (arthritis).

Turmeric is considered to be anti-cancer because it has a triple action: It neutralizes those substances and conditions which can cause cancer; It directly helps a cell retain its integrity if threatened by carcinogens; If a tumor does grow the Curcumins can often destroy it.

When a virus replicates the ‘long terminal repeat’ (LTR) sequence is activated. Without this activation there can be no replication of a virus like the HIV. Harvard research proves the Curcumins to be powerful inhibitors of HIV LTR. Turmeric and the Curcumins have also been shown to help the Immune system’s T-cells survive and thrive, another strong anti-AIDS mechanism.

Turmeric protects from parasites that can cause so many mental and physical problems, including poor digestion.

For at least 1000 years Chinese Medicine has used Turmeric especially for the Spleen, Stomach, and Liver Meridians. They use it to stimulate and purify, and as an anti-biotic, anti-viral, and an analgesic. As such it is used to stimulate and strengthen the blood and decrease blood pressure, to clear abdominal pain and stagnation in men, women and children, and to remove stagnant Chi, the pain due to stagnant Chi, and excessive wind element. They consider it one of the better herbs for women because it stimulates the uterus and clears menstrual stagnation, dysmenorrhea and amenorrhea due to congested blood arising from a lack of heat or simply a deficiency. With the way that Turmeric can move the Chi, Turmeric intake in combination with Yin asanas can be seen as an herbal equivalent of an acupuncture session.

Healing Properties Overview

Besides flavoring food, to purify the blood and remedy skin conditions is probably the most common use of Turmeric in Ayurveda. The principle organs that it treats are the skin, heart, liver and lungs. Sushruta recommended it for epilepsy and bleeding disorders. Charaka recommends it for skin diseases, to purify the body mind, and to help the lungs expel kapha. Activities of Turmeric include: alternative, analgesic, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor, anti-allergic, antioxidant, antiseptic, antispasmodic, appetizer, astringent, cardiovascular, carminative, cholagogue, digestive, diuretic, stimulant, and vulnerary. Therapeutic uses include: AIDS/HIV, anemia, cancer, diabetes, digestion, food poisoning, gallstones, indigestion, IBS, parasites, poor circulation, staph infections, and wounds. Turmeric helps regulate the female reproductive system and purifies the uterus and breast-milk, and in men it purifies and builds semen, which is counter intuitive for a pungent bitter. It reduces fevers, diarrhea, urinary disorders, insanity, poisoning, cough, and lactation problems in general. It is used to treat external ulcers that respond to nothing else. Turmeric decreases kapha and so is used to remove mucus in the throat, watery discharges like leucorrhea, and any pus in the eyes, ears, or in wounds, etc.

Adding Turmeric to your daily life;

Turmeric can be easily consumed on a daily base by making a herbal tea out of it;
Add finely chopped fresh turmeric or turmeric powder to boiling hot water, together with a slice of lime or lemon, and let it steep for while.*
Like most Indian and South-East Asian dishes will contain Turmeric, maybe just try to add some Turmeric to any dish you prepare and see how it will work out.

Please do not consider this text as a medical advice, and always consult your doctor to treat any medical condition.

*Turmeric is also used for dying fabric, especially Monk robes. With that said, it has the quality to stain your plastic-ware permanently yellow.

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