Malasana A & B (garland pose)

Malasana A & B (garland pose)

malasana

An abandoned pose.
There was a time that the 1th, 2nd and the advanced didn’t existed and the asana’s were taught one after another. The first Westerners receiving teachings from Shri K Pattabhi Jois have been instructed in this matter. Somewhere in that time, the introduction of Asthanga yoga to the west, Shri K Pattabhi Jois systematized the sequence further and divided it into separate series, and each with a different focus.  From that time on, the series has had several changes,  asana’s were taken out (janu sirsasana D), others put in (parivritta parsvakonasana). Malasana was abandoned, which used to have a key function in connecting the 1st with the 2nd series.
Malasana is a squatting pose variation (upavesasana), and very good for maintaining mobility. The benefits are;

  • Malasana stretches the ankles, groins, sacrum, lower back and hips.
  • Tones the belly and can provide relief from lower back strain.
  • Stimulates metabolism and digestive organs.

Squatting was very much part of the daily life in India in those days, and luckily still is (to a lesser extend) , and this pose wouldn’t have been considered a difficult pose. For most western people it does seem to be impossible (without use of a belt), sitting in a squat position, wrapping the arms around the knees and joining the hands on the back, + keeping the heels on the floor. Squatting a couple of times a day keeps the pelvic floor healthy and strong. (it is pushing abdomen in and down). In the pelvic area are two cavities, the deepest one, in the narrow bottom part between the hip bones, keeps the bladder, reproductive and bile organs. The upper one, separated by a membrane,  contains the small and large intestines.  The pelvic floor has a hammock shape keeping the organs together and nice in position. When organs are compressed, which will happen with pelvic prolapse/weak pelvis,  it can lead to cancerous cells, (cell compression in general can lead to cancer). Maybe good reasons to fit malasana into your (daily) yoga asana practice.
Malasana used to be the connection asana between the 1th and the 2nd series (ashtanga vinyasa), from setu bandhasana into malasana going to pashasana. The story of these asana’s is that the 1st series is for the mortal, the second for a stage higher then that. Crossing the bridge (setu bandha) from the 1st to the 2nd series, from the mortal to a stage closer to the gods. You surrender yourself in malasana (Mala/Maalaa, garland, a string with 108 beads used in prayer), after that; binding the gods together in pashasana.*
Malasana with bending forward is a counter pose after the setu bandhasana and prepares for another version of the squat pose, pashasana, with an added twist. Pashasana is now considered the first asana of the 2nd series. Variation B is wrapping the hands around the heels, bringing the top of the head closer to the floor and rounding the spine more.

‘Malasana’ comes from the Sanskrit word “Maalaa” ;
माला = Maalaa = garland; Necklace; Rosary
मल = Mala = excrement, primarily stool
The pose described here, and used to be in the ashtanga series, and also described in Iyengar’s; “light on yoga”, is a variation of squatting. There is variation A) taking the arms around the knees and joining them on the back. B) taking the hands around the heels, and bringing the chin to the floor. Both symbolize surrendering and the arms are like a garland around the legs. Often the upavesasana, the regular squat pose, with the hands in namaskar mudra in front of the chest, and the feet wider apart, is translated into English as the garland pose, as both poses are similar. Though, as yoga describes that in this posture, the intestines are in the best position to release all waste that is left after digestion, the upavesasana can be be also named Malasana, referring to the meaning of Mala = excrement, primarily stool. In transliteration from Sanskrit into English, where the English is lacking a proper writing for the long “aa” and short “a”. Mala can refer both to Mala, or Maalaa.

*This information has been obtained from Noah Mckenny (see biography for details)

Precautions
This asana should be avoided in case of groin, knee injury, back problems, high blood pressure or any cardiac problems, recent surgery and pregnancy. Be slow and careful while doing the asana as in almost all the yoga asanas. This asana should be avoided by ladies if menstruating or should be performed under guidance of a yoga expert during those days.

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gomukhasana C (horned double pigeon pose)

gomukhasana C  (horned double pigeon pose)

gomukhasana C uprightgomukhasana C forward bend
This post is related to a series of post about asana variations.
similar posts >>>
sarvanga laghu vajrasana (B), supported little thunderbolt pose <http://wp.me/s3RIqJ-217&gt;
urdhva mukha baddha konasana, butterfly-fish pose <http://wp.me/s3RIqJ-217&gt;

Some yogi’s claim that are as many asana’s as there are life-forms in this universe. Every being is a unique expression of the divine, an electron-magnetic signature. Others say that are 72.000 asana’s, some say 72 and others hold that if you master the 12 basic asana’s, you will receive all the benefits and attain yoga. The last see the majority of asana’s as variations on these 12. Yoga is honoring the diversity of nature, with that the expression of you body mind. Be your own teacher, and keep a beginners mind, when ever you practice yoga asana. Keep exploring, experimenting, that is how you will learn. Find calmness in a pose, that doesn’t say you have to be completely still or motionless. Keep the body mind active, let the body explore the pose. Exploring in ways of endurance, focus and relaxation. (sthira & sukha) Some days you want to take it even further, letting creativity into the asana and see where the asana will take you.
This variation of agnistambhasana ( “knee-to-ankle pose, double pigeon, square pose” ) is especially for the people that like a deeper stretch to the outer hips.  Additional making a forward bend out of it. Make sure to work both sides, equal time, taking the heels further over the outside of the opposite  leg. Only attempt this asana when agnistambhasana can be done comfortably over longer periods of time. If that is not the case stay with agnistam or other good hip openers like; baddha konasana (bound angle/cobbler’s pose and eye of the needle pose. This pose requires flexibility in the lower body, including the outer hips, hamstrings, quadriceps, lower back, and gluteus maximus/medius.
sequencing;

  • From; agneestam asana (double pigeon/firelog pose); First work toward bringing your shins parallel to the top edge of your mat, keeping your right shin stacked directly above your left shin. Both shins should be at 90-degree angles to each thigh.Flex your feet and press through your heels. Spread your toes. If this can all be accomplished at ease and at peace, continue. Press your groins toward the floor and sit up straight. Keep the front of your torso long. Take the heel further over the outer edge of the opposite knee, up to your range of being at ease. Rest your fingertips on the floor at either side of your body, as variation walk the hands forward along the floor, folding the torso over the crossed legs. Holding the pose longer. Release the pose by very slowly and gently extending both legs along the floor.
  • From; gomukhasana; open the legs slowly, so that a little space is created in between the legs, moving towards agneestam asana, but keep the legs where you play the edge of the stretch. Keeping groins pressed toward the floor, spine straight, front of the body is long. Release the pose by very slowly and gently extending both legs along the floor, or by sliding back into gomukhasana

Toward the end of a yoga class when the body is warm and limber and making it a longer stretch preparing for shavasana, final relaxation.

  • breath; Deep calm breathing while in the pose.
  • time; 3 to  5 min for a passive stretch.  Otherwise 12 deep breaths to one minute.
  • awareness;
  • dhristi; in between the eyebrows,

health benefits;

  • Opens and stretches the (outer) hips
  • Stretches the groins and buttocks gently
  • Stimulates the abdominal organs, which helps to regulate digestion and metabolism.
  • Strengthens legs and calves
  • Calms the mind
  •  Relieves anxiety, tension and stress
  • Sitting upright with your spine aligned calms the mind and relieves anxiety and mental tension, stress (when regular practicing this asana)

Precautions
This asana should be avoided in case of groin, knee or hip injury, back problems, high blood pressure or any cardiac problems, recent surgery and pregnancy. Be slow and careful while doing the asana as in almost all the yoga asanas.

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sarvanga laghu vajrasana ( supported little thunderbolt pose )

sarvanga laghu vajrasana   ( supported little thunderbolt pose )

laghu vajrasana
This post is related to a series of post about asana variations.
similar posts >>>
gomukhasana C, horned double pigeon pose <http://wp.me/p3RIqJ-3F&gt;
urdhva mukha baddha konasana, butterfly-fish pose <http://wp.me/s3RIqJ-217&gt;
Some yogi’s claim that are as many asana’s as there are life-forms in this universe. Every being is a unique expression of the divine, an electron-magnetic signature. Others say that are 72.000 asana’s, some say 72 and others hold that if you master the 12 basic asana’s, you will receive all the benefits and attain yoga. The last see the majority of asana’s as variations on these 12. Yoga is honoring the diversity of nature, with that the expression of you body mind. Be your own teacher, and keep a beginners mind, when ever you practice yoga asana. Keep exploring, experimenting, that is how you will learn. Find calmness in a pose, that doesn’t say you have to be completely still or motionless. Keep the body mind active, let the body explore the pose. Exploring in ways of endurance, focus and relaxation. (sthira & sukha) Some days you want to take it even further, letting creativity into the asana and see where the asana will take you.
A supported variation of laghu vajrasana, little thunderbolt pose.  And more or less an hybrid of usthrasana and the laghu vajrasana. A level deeper into the back bend, but not yet as deep as in laghu vajrasana. A good preperation for advancing into full laghu vajrasana and the supta vajrasana in the “nadi shodana” (2nd or intermediate series), ashtanga vinyasa series.  Same actions apply as for ustrasana, but now taking the elbows into the inside arches of the feet.

  • From vajrasana (or taking a vinyasa), diamond pose; inhaling deeply, coming on the knees with the thighs perpendicular to the floor.  Exhale arching back taking the elbows at the inside of the heels, support on the arches of the feet, and pressing the palms into the buttocks.  (Try to keep the lower legs in contact with the floor. If necessary, separate the knees, make sure that you are not over-straining the muscles and ligaments of the legs). Keep pressing the thighs and hips forward. The buttocks are taking support on the palms.  Crown of the head on the floor, relax into the pose, breathe deeply and slowly in the final position. Getting out of the pose, reverse order, squeeze the shoulders more together to release the elbows from the ankles/arches and get back up on an inhalation.

sequencing; before the classical laghu vajrasana (A) for preparation, or using this pose as an alternative. It can be sequenced together with other back bends (after ustrasana, camel pose), or on its own and being preceded or followed with a forward bend and a twist.

  • From; on both knees, knees hip width apart, inhaling lengthening the spine, exhaling arching back pushing the hips and thighs to the front. Inhaling back out of the pose, using elbows and abdomen for support.
  • Alternatively from a supine position taking the arms under the spine, arching the back and come into the asana on an exhale. To release, reverse order .
  • breath; exhaling into the pose, inhaling out of the pose. Deep calm breathing while in the pose.
  • time; 5 to 9 deep and slow breaths.
  • awareness; on the lower back, abdomen or breath.
  • dhristi; in between the eyebrows,

health benefits;

  • This asana massages the abdominal organs alleviating digestive ailments and constipation. (strengthens the abdomen)
  • It tones the spinal nerves, makes the back flexible and realigns rounded shoulders. The nerves in the neck, the thyroid and parathyroid glands are particularly stimulated.
  • The ribcage is stretched and expanded fully, which helps to fill the lungs to its maximum capacity and bringing more oxygen into the system.
  • It enhances courage and confidence level in the personality.
  • It is beneficial for those suffering from asthma, bronchitis and other lung ailments.
  • It loosens up the legs and strengthens them in preparation for sitting in meditation asana’s. (opens the quadriceps)
  • It enhances creativity and intelligence as it increases the circulation in the brain.

Precautions
This asana should be avoided in case of groin, knee injury, back problems, high blood pressure or any cardiac problems, recent surgery and pregnancy. Be slow and careful while doing the asana as in almost all the yoga asanas. It is an intense backbend and should only be attempted by experienced yoga practitioners. Camel pose is a more moderate version of this position.

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urdhva mukha baddha konasana (butterfly-fish pose)

urdhva mukha baddha konasana (butterfly-fish pose)

urdhva mukha baddha konasana

This post is related to a series of post about asana variations.
similar posts >>>
gomukhasana C, horned double pigeon pose <http://wp.me/p3RIqJ-3F&gt;
sarvanga laghu vajrasana (B), supported little thunderbolt pose <http://wp.me/s3RIqJ-217&gt;

Some yogi’s claim that are as many asana’s as there are life-forms in this universe. Every being is a unique expression of the divine, an electron-magnetic signature. Others say that are 72.000 asana’s, some say 72 and others hold that if you master the 12 basic asana’s, you will receive all the benefits and attain yoga. The last see the majority of asana’s as variations on these 12. Yoga is honoring the diversity of nature, with that the expression of you body mind. Be your own teacher, and keep a beginners mind, when ever you practice yoga asana. Keep exploring, experimenting, that is how you will learn. Find calmness in a pose, that doesn’t say you have to be completely still or motionless. Keep the body mind active, let the body explore the pose. Exploring in ways of endurance, focus and relaxation. (sthira & sukha) Some days you want to take it even further, letting creativity into the asana and see where the asana will take you.
Urdhva mukha baddha konasana (upward facing bound angle pose)  is a hybrid between baddha konasana and matsyasana. It combines the benefits of both poses and adds an extra squeeze in between the shoulder blades, and loosens them from the spine. It is a strong groin- and hip-opener, + chest (hearth) opener. Considering this it can have an effect on your emotional body. Ideally practiced at the end of the practice, after sarvangasana.

sequencing;

  • From baddha konasana, carefully recline back with an arched spine. Bring the top of head on the mat, not the back of head. You may want to take the hands next to ears for a moment to give yourself a push up and get comfortable into this position. Take the hands under the outside upper legs and let them take the outside ankles. Pull the ankles closer to the pelvis and squeeze the shoulders more together and rest on the elbows and forearms. Adjust the positon of the head and hands to find your maximum arch of the back, and depth of the hips. Getting out; release hands and arms take support on the elbows and fore-arms, slowly come back up.
  • From mastyenasana, take the legs into a baddha konasana position, soles together, and take the hands around the outside ankles and pull them closer to the pelvis. Keep the top of head on the mat, and carefully arch the spine, support on the elbows. Getting out; releasing the ankles,  slowly get back up, support on the elbows and fore-arms. (or taking an ashtanga vinyasa variation; cakrasana to get out of the pose).
  • From dhanur asana roll into parsva dhanur asana. Roll further into urdhva mukha baddha konasana, adjust to make your self more comfortable. Getting out; roll on to the other side to take the other half of parsa dhanur asana, or roll back into the same side parsva dhanur asana.

(as you will be resting on the top of your head, which is a sensitive spot, you may want to make sure that you have a yoga mat under the head)

  • breath; exhaling into the pose, contracting abdomen and arching the spine, inhaling out of the pose. Deep calm breathing while in the pose.
  • time; when practicing it as a counter-asana for sarvangasana, take half the time of the time in sarvangasana, to stay in the pose. When practicing it as a more restorative pose at the end of a practice for opening the heart, chest and hips, before going in to a shavasana, take about 2 min or more if comfortable. Otherwise, 5 to 9 deep breaths.
  • awareness; on mooladhara chakra, anahata or the sahasara chakra.
  • dhristi; in between the eyebrows, (internal)

health benefits;

  • Expands the lung capacity
  • Stimulates the heart and improves circulation
  • Encourages deep breathing
  • Helps relieve asthma
  • Opens the chest, correcting round-shoulders
  • Strengthens the back muscles
  • Gives a backward stretch to the thoracic and cervical sections of the spine
  • Gently stretches the neck muscles and shoulders
  • Brings an increased supply of blood to the cervical and thoracic regions of the back
  • relieves sciatic pain and prevents hernia
  • The pelvis, the abdomen and the back are stimulated by a plentiful blood supply.
  • Stretches the inner thighs, groins and knees
  • Massages your internal organs and improves digestive circulation
  • Stimulates abdominal organs, ovaries, prostate gland and bladder
  • When practiced regularly, it relieves pain and heaviness in the testicles
  • High blood pressure
  • Flat feet
  • Infertility
  • For women, coupled with Sarvangasana, it checks irregular menses and helps the ovaries to function properly.
  • Stimulates the anahata chakra (heart psychic center), mooladhara (root center)  and sahasara  chakra
  • Brings more prana to the neck, shoulders and pelvis
  • Helps to regulate emotions and stress

variation; let go of the ankles and take the hands on the knees to add a little weight to get them a bit more close to the floor.
Precautions
This asana should be avoided in case of groin, knee injury, back problems, high blood pressure or any cardiac problems, recent surgery and pregnancy. Be slow and careful while doing the asana as in almost all the yoga asanas. This asana should be avoided by ladies if menstruating or should be performed under guidance of a yoga expert during those days.

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turmeric the most essential herb for a yoga (asana) practice

turmeric the most essential herb for a yoga (asana) practice

This post is related to a series of post about nutrition & yoga.

similar posts >>>

asana, shavasana, coconuts <http://wp.me/p3RIqJ-2M >
brahmacharya and pineapple < http://wp.me/p3RIqJ-2K >
centering with cinnamon < http://wp.me/p3RIqJ-2Q >

ginger for tapas < http://wp.me/p3RIqJ-2S >
light on nightshade vegetables < http://wp.me/p3RIqJ-2I >

“a day without turmeric is a day without a downward facing dog”

Asana’s work from the outside of the body into the inside of the body, pranayama works from the inside, the core, to the outside of the body. Both work on all aspects of the body mind, from the gross to the subtle. Pratyahara works from the senses and the mind. Dharana works with the mind. Meditation is beyond the mind and works with the subtle energies within the body mind. Nutrients work on molecular level, they can do there work from the inside of the cell, and penetrate the cell from the outside. Taking particular nutrients together with a yoga practice, can upgrade the beneficial effects more, what yoga has prepared within the body mind, nutrients can take beyond that. And/or what the nutrients have been doing on a cellular level, yoga can act on.

Most of this information comes from the following sources;

The Ayurvedic Spice of Life ©2003 Prashanti de Jager (www.omorganics.com)
Yoga and Ayurveda. Dr. David Frawley.

Turmeric is truly a great herb, the following text is merely an abbreviation of the wide range of benefits of Turmeric, and meant to inspire you to add turmeric to your daily diet as adding yoga to your daily life, and notice how well those 2 can go together for your general well-being.
from tao te ching;
When you look for it, there is nothing to see.
When you listen for it, there is nothing to hear.
When you use it, it is inexhaustible.

Dr David Frawley rounds it all up; “There is little that it cannot do in the realm of healing and much that no other herb is able to accomplish. Turmeric has a broad spectrum of actions, mild but certain effects, and is beneficial for long term and daily usage. Though it is a common spice, few people, including herbalists know of its great value and are using it to the extent possible. It is an herb that one should get to know and live with. Turmeric gently stimulates the digestive fire and makes the food easier to digest and absorb. It also helps detoxify the food. In addition it improves the quality of food, adding nutritive and blood building properties to the oils with which it combines, particularly ghee (clarified butter), with which it has an important affinity. It is essential to Ayurvedic diets. In addition Turmeric is a great woman’s herb and is helpful for many gynecological problems. It mildly promotes menstruation, relieves menstrual pain and cramping, is great for countering PMS, and helps build the blood. It helps guard against or even remove cysts in the breast or uterus, and is a good guard against breast cancer. In addition it helps beautify the skin and improve the complexion, promoting circulation and nutrition to the surface of the body. It vitalizes the body’s own natural healing energy through its action of strengthening digestion and circulation, and aiding in the regulation of all bodily systems. For all these reasons Turmeric is likened to the Divine Mother, bestowing numerous blessings and helping us in all dangers, difficulties and conditions of weakness and debility.”

For many reasons Turmeric is also one of the best herbs/foods of Yoga: It is one of the most potent purifying herbs in Ayurveda, cleansing all the bodies including physical and subtle, from muscles to marmas; It is one of the safest herbs; It increases flexibility; It reduces pain and inflammation from practice which means it allows more opportunity to perfect asana’s, stay in asana’s longer and stay in asana’s with greater ease, more sukha and sthira; It increases prana, the flow of prana and purifies prana. Yoga scriptures like the Shiva Samhita recommends that a Yogi take some ghee and milk before asana and pranayama practice, and many traditional yogis add Turmeric to that.

One focus of Yoga Asana is the digestive system and digestion (Gastro-Intestinal (GI) system), which is the basis of our mental and physical health. Turmeric is a great carminative and continues with what the asana have started. Carminatives tend to increase absorption and nurture the intestinal flora. Able to calm an upset digestive system by getting rid of gas and distention. Turmeric is one of the best carminatives because though it leans towards being heating-pungent, it is very balanced and does not aggravate any of the doshas if taken in normal amounts, a few grams per day. Turmeric treats the entire GI system. It is traditionally used for weak stomachs, poor digestion,dyspepsia, to normalize metabolism, to help digest protein, and to increase the bio-availability of food and the ability of the stomach to withstand digestive acids. Turmeric detoxifies the body and mind and in this way helps the body cure itself. One sure sign of this is that it increases the level of the enzyme glutathione S-transferase (GST), which is essential to detoxification. Turmeric is one of the dashemani, the 10 best herbs to treat poisoning and to purify.

Turmeric is an excellent anti-inflammatory herb and therefore is very good treatment for arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, injuries, trauma, and stiffness from both under activity and over activity. If used before and after any surgery it will decrease the pain and inflammation and accelerate the healing and the return to balance. Though Yogis minimize the use of pungents, they do use Turmeric for many reasons, one being it is so good for the tendons and ligaments. It helps them to attain and hold asanas and to avoid injuries. In the same way it minimizes the pain and inflammation related to any kind of exercise or strenuous activity.

Yoga works on the total body and mind, not only the muscles and joints, similar Turmeric has multiple effects on the total body and mind. It is known that Turmeric, and especially the Curcumins, inhibits skin cancer, likely due to decreasing the expression of proto-oncogenes. External application stops pain and swelling, heals wounds, and treats many skin diseases ranging from acne to leprosy.Since Turmeric is bitter and anti-inflammatory, it is excellent for hot skin diseases, especially wet eczema.

Purification, another important focus of yoga, and one of the Niyama’s; “Saucha”. A great alterative, Ayurveda uses Turmeric to purify and move the blood, for instance in the uterus during the menstrual cycle. Curcumin is actually very similar to one of the active molecules in Chaparral, a great Native American blood purifier. Turmeric also protects your liver from toxins and pathogens. It is  known to both destroy major hepatoxins, like aflatoxin, and to rebuild the liver after being attacked by hepatoxins. Turmeric increases the secretion of bile, promotes bilification, and may prevent cholelithiasis.

Turmeric supports the heart in many ways. For instance, there are platelets that flow in the blood whose job it is to form blood clots when we are wounded. The stress of being wounded causes the platelets to accumulate and stick together. In these days we experience a lot of the same stress without being wounded and our platelets start sticking together increasing the chance of a heart attack or stroke. Turmeric is known to inhibit this. Turmeric also removes cholesterol from the liver and inhibits its assimilation, which means that it gives your heart double protection from cholesterol.

Both Yoga and Turmeric have beneficial effects on the respiratory system and is one of the main traditional uses of yoga and turmeric. Yoga (asana and pranayama) are widely used to treat asthma, and cleansing the lungs. Turmeric as an anti-oxidant it protects the lungs from pollution and toxins. It also helps the oxygen transfer from the lungs to the blood. Turmeric with ghee is traditionally used to get rid of cough and to treat asthma.

Yoga has always been used for its therapeutic qualities, and it is here where yoga and ayurveda come really together. To treat a condition with both yoga and ayurveda, in this case, Turmeric, whom both work on the total body and mind, the beneficial effects can be multiple and synergistic.

Taken internally or used externally Turmeric is anti-viral, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, anti-parasitic, and anthelmintic (anti-worm). The essential oil, the water extract, and the extracted curcumins all show this activity. It interferes with the ability of microbes and viruses to replicate themselves and it increases your Immune system’s ability to fight the infection. It kills many bacteria in vivo and in vitro including staph and salmonella so it is great against staph infections and food poisoning. The fresh juice Turmeric is often used for many antibiotic applications such as wounds or whenever an antiseptic is needed. As an antibiotic Turmeric has been compared with penicillin on gram positive organisms and with streptomycin on gram negative organisms. In both cases Turmeric came in second but gave a strong showing.

Oxidation by free radicals is linked with accelerated aging and virtually every major chronic disease including atherosclerosis, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, cataracts, and rheumatoid arthritis. One way to stop this is with anti-oxidants like Vitamin C and E and Turmeric. A second way is with certain enzymes which engage the free radicals and destroy their ability to react. Working double time, the curcuminoids as anti-oxidants are 8 times stronger than vitamin E and also increase the number and activity of free radical destroying enzymes, like superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase.. This means Turmeric is good at keeping you feeling and looking young; protecting you from mutating cells, tumors and cancer; preventing and removing oxidized cholesterol thereby preventing heart attacks; and reducing pain and acute (injuries) and chronic inflammations (arthritis).

Turmeric is considered to be anti-cancer because it has a triple action: It neutralizes those substances and conditions which can cause cancer; It directly helps a cell retain its integrity if threatened by carcinogens; If a tumor does grow the Curcumins can often destroy it.

When a virus replicates the ‘long terminal repeat’ (LTR) sequence is activated. Without this activation there can be no replication of a virus like the HIV. Harvard research proves the Curcumins to be powerful inhibitors of HIV LTR. Turmeric and the Curcumins have also been shown to help the Immune system’s T-cells survive and thrive, another strong anti-AIDS mechanism.

Turmeric protects from parasites that can cause so many mental and physical problems, including poor digestion.

For at least 1000 years Chinese Medicine has used Turmeric especially for the Spleen, Stomach, and Liver Meridians. They use it to stimulate and purify, and as an anti-biotic, anti-viral, and an analgesic. As such it is used to stimulate and strengthen the blood and decrease blood pressure, to clear abdominal pain and stagnation in men, women and children, and to remove stagnant Chi, the pain due to stagnant Chi, and excessive wind element. They consider it one of the better herbs for women because it stimulates the uterus and clears menstrual stagnation, dysmenorrhea and amenorrhea due to congested blood arising from a lack of heat or simply a deficiency. With the way that Turmeric can move the Chi, Turmeric intake in combination with Yin asanas can be seen as an herbal equivalent of an acupuncture session.

Healing Properties Overview

Besides flavoring food, to purify the blood and remedy skin conditions is probably the most common use of Turmeric in Ayurveda. The principle organs that it treats are the skin, heart, liver and lungs. Sushruta recommended it for epilepsy and bleeding disorders. Charaka recommends it for skin diseases, to purify the body mind, and to help the lungs expel kapha. Activities of Turmeric include: alternative, analgesic, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor, anti-allergic, antioxidant, antiseptic, antispasmodic, appetizer, astringent, cardiovascular, carminative, cholagogue, digestive, diuretic, stimulant, and vulnerary. Therapeutic uses include: AIDS/HIV, anemia, cancer, diabetes, digestion, food poisoning, gallstones, indigestion, IBS, parasites, poor circulation, staph infections, and wounds. Turmeric helps regulate the female reproductive system and purifies the uterus and breast-milk, and in men it purifies and builds semen, which is counter intuitive for a pungent bitter. It reduces fevers, diarrhea, urinary disorders, insanity, poisoning, cough, and lactation problems in general. It is used to treat external ulcers that respond to nothing else. Turmeric decreases kapha and so is used to remove mucus in the throat, watery discharges like leucorrhea, and any pus in the eyes, ears, or in wounds, etc.

Adding Turmeric to your daily life;

Turmeric can be easily consumed on a daily base by making a herbal tea out of it;
Add finely chopped fresh turmeric or turmeric powder to boiling hot water, together with a slice of lime or lemon, and let it steep for while.*
Like most Indian and South-East Asian dishes will contain Turmeric, maybe just try to add some Turmeric to any dish you prepare and see how it will work out.

Please do not consider this text as a medical advice, and always consult your doctor to treat any medical condition.

*Turmeric is also used for dying fabric, especially Monk robes. With that said, it has the quality to stain your plastic-ware permanently yellow.

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centering with cinnamon

centering with cinnamon

This post is related to a series of post about nutrition & yoga.

similar posts >>>

asana, shavasana, coconuts <http://wp.me/p3RIqJ-2M >
brahmacharya and pineapple < http://wp.me/p3RIqJ-2K >
centering with cinnamon < http://wp.me/p3RIqJ-2Q >

ginger for tapas < http://wp.me/p3RIqJ-2S >
light on nightshade vegetables < http://wp.me/p3RIqJ-2I >
turmeric the most essential herb for a yoga (asana) practice < http://wp.me/p3RIqJ-2O >

Asana’s work from the outside of the body into the inside of the body, pranayama works from the inside, the core, to the outside of the body. Both work on all aspects of the body mind, from the gross to the subtle. Pratyahara works from the senses and the mind. Dharana works with the mind. Meditation is beyond the mind and works with the subtle energies within the body mind. Nutrients work on molecular level, they can do there work from the inside of the cell, and penetrate the cell from the outside. Taking particular nutrients together with a yoga practice, can upgrade the benificial effects more, what yoga has prepared within the body mind, nutrients can take beyond that. And/or what the nutrients have been doing on a cellular level, yoga can act on.

Centering, finding your center, going within; starting with the foundation is the basics of yoga. That is why we often start in Tadasana or Samathiti. Connection with our feet. Bringing the awareness to the root center.
from tao te ching;
If you realize that you have enough,
you are truly rich.
If you stay in the center
and embrace death with your whole heart,
you will endure forever.
When we are centered we can hold the world. Cinnamon is one of those herbs with multiple effects on the body mind, and very beneficial with a yoga practice. A “grounding” herb, common, affordable and easy to use. Adding cinnamon to your daily diet can help you finding your center, or staying more centered. According Ayurveda cinnamon being a sweet spice is sattvic (balanced). It is a spicy aromatic too, good at stimulating the mind, promoting insight and perception. It has enough “spice” to lift you up, but still keeping both feet solid on the floor. That is the dynamics of balance. Ever watched a cat “sleeping”,  being completely relaxed yet with the softest little sound the ears will immediately point into that direction of where the sound came from. That is being centered.
Continuing in ayurvedic terms, cinnamon pacifies vata and kapha dosha’s, but it may aggravate pitta dosha if taken in excess.  It has a sweet, pungent, and bitter rasa or initial taste, it is heating, and has a pungent vipak or aftertaste.  In ayurveda, cinnamon is used as a remedy for diabetes, indigestion, and colds, and it is often recommended for people with the kapha dosha. It’s a common ingredient in chai tea, and it is believed to improve the digestion of fruit, milk and other dairy products.
In traditional Chinese medicine, Cassia cinnamon is used for colds, flatulence, nausea, diarrhea, and painful menstrual periods. It’s also believed to improve energy, vitality, and circulation and be particularly useful for people who tend to feel hot in their upper body but have cold feet.
While there are four main types of cinnamon, the primary ones which are sold are Cassia cinnamon and Ceylon cinnamon. The majority of this spice that’s available in grocery stores is the lesser expensive variety, Cassia cinnamon. It is darker and less sweet than the true Ceylon cinnamon, and its sticks are harder. Cassia cinnamon can’t be easily ground into a powder. The Ceylon variety which imparts the health benefits, while cassia cinnamon contains large doses of the compound coumarin. Couramin can cause certain unwanted side effects, such as increased heart rate and liver and kidney problems.
“Health” ,can be defined merely by not being sick, not having any pains, it can also be defined as being in complete harmony, from body mind to everything that is happening around you, tapping into an unlimited source of energy. Cinnamon (in general a good diet) and yoga can help in finding this harmony. In short cinnamon improves digestion and absorption, and promotes elimination.  It removes toxins from the body, and improves circulation by strengthening the heart and warming the kidneys.  As a blood thinner, cinnamon prevents heart attacks. Additionally, cinnamon may be used in the treatment of respiratory and sinus congestion, bronchitis, colds, and the flu. Recent studies have found that cinnamon may have a beneficial effect on blood sugar. Preliminary lab and animal studies have found that cinnamon may have antibacterial and anti-fungal properties. It’s active against Candida albicans, the fungus that causes yeast infections and thrush, and Helicobacter pylori, the bacteria responsible for stomach ulcers.
(People taking diabetes medication or any medication that affects blood glucose or insulin levels shouldn’t take therapeutic doses of cinnamon unless they’re under a doctor’s supervision. Taking them together may have an additive effect and cause blood glucose levels to dip too low.)
A 2004 study found that the smell of cinnamon helped boost brain function. Study participants performance on tasks involving virtual recognition memory, attentional processes, working memory, and visual-motor speed while using a computer were measured comparing the relative effects of jasmine, peppermint, cinnamon and no odor. Cinnamon had the strongest positive effect on study subjects’ cognitive processing skills. Cinnamon’s aroma comes from cinnamonaldehyde, an essential oil in the bark of cinnamon trees. The Moolhadara chakra, translated as root center, at the base of the spine, is according the science of yoga connected with the sense organ the nose, with smell, and plays an important role to feel and be centered.
Some common ayurvedic home remedies for cinnamon:

  • To reduce the kapha provoking properties of rice and other carbohydrates, add cinnamon to the dish.
  • For a common cold, cough or congestion, combine ½ tsp cinnamon and 1 tsp of raw, uncooked honey and take two or three times a day.
  • For coughs, colds, and sore throats, boil cinnamon sticks in water and inhale the vapor.
  • For a sinus headache, make a paste of ½  tsp cinnamon powder and water and apply topically.
  • For diarrhea, combine ½ tsp of cinnamon powder, a pinch of nutmeg. and ½ cup yogurt and consume this combination two to three times daily.
  •  For lowering LDL cholesterol, take ½ tsp of cinnamon daily.

When consumed together with honey, it can  ease digestion, helping to prevent gas. Honey and cinnamon also provide energy, making people more mentally alert and ready for physical activity.
Honey possesses natural anti-bacterial properties. Honey poured on wounds or burns prevents infection and promotes healing. Regular consumption of honey and cinnamon together, when combined with an overall healthy diet and moderate activity level, can prevent heart disease by clearing clogged arteries.
Drinking honey and cinnamon in lukewarm water results in them moving through the bladder and cleansing it, as well as clearing infections there. Drinking this beverage on a regular basis can also relieve, and in some cases entirely cure, arthritis pain. This drink also strengthens the immune system, helping ward off colds as well as some viruses. Applying a paste of honey and cinnamon to infected gums can ease pain and bleeding as well as slow the progression of the infection.
In Traditional Chinese Medicine, cinnamon is viewed as possessing heat or yang, and is thus used to cure ills stemming from excess yin or coldness. Honey, in this system, is viewed as a neutral substance, balanced between yin and yang.

more information : http://www.naturalnews.com/034280_honey_cures_cinnamon.html#ixzz2iLd0mxY1
This information has worked for us  Please do not consider them as medical advice, and always consult your doctor to treat any medical condition. ahimsaka satya banner 01

ginger for tapas

ginger for tapas

This post is related to a series of post about nutrition & yoga.

similar posts >>>

asana, shavasana, coconuts <http://wp.me/p3RIqJ-2M >
brahmacharya and pineapple < http://wp.me/p3RIqJ-2K >
centering with cinnamon < http://wp.me/p3RIqJ-2Q >
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Asana’s work from the outside of the body into the inside of the body, pranayama works from the inside, the core, to the outside of the body. Both work on all aspects of the body mind, from the gross to the subtle. Pratyahara works from the senses and the mind. Dharana works with the mind. Meditation is beyond the mind and works with the subtle energies within the body mind. Nutrients work on molecular level, they can do there work from the inside of the cell, and penetrate the cell from the outside. Taking particular nutrients together with a yoga practice, can upgrade the benificial effects more, what yoga has prepared within the body mind, nutrients can take beyond that. And/or what the nutrients have been doing on a cellular level, yoga can act on.

Tapas, Sanskrit for purifying heat, austerity. A daily asana practice builds Tapas, zest, discipline. Fire, the element that transforms, earth into water, water into air. Where would the body be without its heat, the digestive fire, the burning fire of the heart, the fire in the eyes and the fire of the mind. The digestive system and digestion is the basis of our mental and physical health. Yoga and Ginger both can play a key role in it. Asana stimulate and massages the internal organs, promotes digestion, pranayama takes it further with exercises like kapala bhati and bhastrika, pratyahara turns the fire of the eyes within, dharyana uses the fire of the mind to reach a single-pointed mind, and meditation can be compared with a steady flame at a windless spot. Completely still yet in full combustion.
from tao te ching;
The Tao is like a bellows:
it is empty yet infinitely capable.
The more you use it, the more it produces;
the more you talk of it, the less you understand.
Hold on to the center.

A direct benefit of Ginger for yoga asana is its long standing reputation for reducing swelling and inflammation. Ginger contains a very potent anti-inflammatory compound called gingerols, which are thought to be the reason why so many people see pain relief from osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. (Traditional ayurvedic texts recommend ginger for therapeutic use for joint pain) It has a healing and restorative effect after a more intense practice. Raw foods that are chlorophyll dominant combined with ginger promote prana (life-force). Ginger fans the digestive fire and makes food easier to digest. It also whets the appetite, improves assimilation and transportation of nutrients to targeted body tissues, and clears the micro-circulatory channels of the body. Using less energy for digestion, the body can redirect this energy to your (spiritual) practice. The few situations in which ginger is contraindicated are in cases of hyper-acidity, during any form of hemorrhage (including menstruation), vertigo and chronic skin disease. Other than in these situations, ginger is an excellent spice that can be used daily.

Ginger is used widely in ayurveda and modern science seems to comply, by way of worldwide research; ratifies its effectiveness in preventing motion or airsickness, improving digestion and its pro-analgesic effect on the joints, particularly in early stages of rheumatoid arthritis.

Ginger is a spicy aromatic, good at stimulating the mind, promoting insight, perception and the tapas in the body mind. It is also considered sattvic (balanced).

The easiest way to bring ginger in your daily diet is by adding some slices of fresh ginger to your tea, or just adding hot water to the slices of ginger. A famous variation is; hot lemon ginger tea. One of the spices in the Indian Chai is ginger.

This information has worked for us  Please do not consider them as medical advice, and always consult your doctor to treat any medical condition.

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